Category Archives: Sewing for children

New Valentine & Stitch patterns: Lotus and Loulou

It is already well over a month since we released our first pattern, the Lotus top, and I am finally getting around to writing a post to accompany the launch… and didn’t even manage to do it before we released our second pattern, Loulou! I definitely need to get speedier at blog-writing…  so here’s a “twofer”, a closer look at the two free patterns that have launched Valentine & Stitch…

Releasing Lotus was so exciting, and it has been even more exciting to see completed versions popping up on Instagram – look for the hashtag #vslotus, or some people have also used #lotustop. The lovely Kelly of Sewing Unaffiliated also wrote a blog post about it here – check it out and read her blog often, you won’t be disappointed!

My first Lotus is the one I call my ‘workout Lotus’. I used to practise yoga a lot, and although I don’t get the chance any more and most of my exercise comes from cycling, I still dream of a day when I’ll get back to it… and when I do my wardrobe will be ready! This Lotus is sewn in a pink viscose jersey from Backstitch – they don’t have it any more but they do have it in a blue colour way, or they have a pink one with narrower stripes. This fabric was such a dream to work with – delicate but still stable enough to hold its shape. I don’t mind visible bra straps as long as they’re co-ordinated so I happily wear this with a bright pink bra, or layered over a sports bra or vest. It does also look nice with a strapless bra – or no bra, which is an option if, like me, you’re not well endowed…

As soon as I made my first Lotus, I could see it in a slinky soft black fabric to pair with skinny jeans or leggings. The off-the-shoulder neckline is sexy without being too revealing, and the swingy fit means I could eat and drink to my heart’s content and still feel comfy. So I call this my ‘date night’ Lotus, even though our ‘date nights’ involve sitting in front of a computer calculating formulae to draft patterns! This version, like all the Lotuses I’ve made for myself, is graded from an XS at the bust to a S at the waist and hips. I made it with a slinky jersey from Fabworks that was a total bargain at £6 a metre, which makes me officially a very cheap date! I used 70cm, so Lotus is definitely a good stashbuster! The fabric wasn’t the easiest to work with as it wanted to slip around everywhere, so I had to take it slowly. The thread tension on my machine went haywire part-way through one of the sleeve hems, so that got unpicked and re-sewn three times (the third was my own fault for not catching the raw edge in the inside stitching. NEVER try to hem a slippy fabric without pins. Even if you’re ready to stick said pins in your own fingers). Apart from that, it was a fun sew and I love the result!

Version B of Lotus is a shorter t-shirt length, and can be casual or dressy depending on your fabric choice. This one is made with a crepe jersey and I call it my ‘office Lotus’ as I wear this one to work with a pencil skirt. The fabric has good drape but more of a structure to it than the slinky date night fabric, so it makes a lovely smart but comfortable top to wear to the office. The fabric was really easy to sew – I thought its thickness might make the hems a bit tricky, but it was very stable and easy to work with.

The fourth and final Lotus I’ve sewn for myself so far is this casual t-shirt version. It’s made from a light cotton jersey with a nice drape, and it looks perfect with jeans at the weekend. I don’t always want a top that’s tight across the tummy if I’m indulging at the weekend, but I do like a top to be fitted at the bust so it doesn’t look like a sack. This version of Lotus ticks all my t-shirt boxes! (and you get a view of our crazy wallpaper as a bonus for this one. You’re welcome ;-))

The last Lotus I made was a Mother’s Day gift for my mum. She helped me with the fitting of the pattern as we buy the same size clothes in RTW but have very different body shapes so it was really helpful to make sure the cut was going to be flattering on all body shapes. As a thank you, I sewed her a tailor-made Lotus: she likes the front and back necklines to be higher on her t-shirts, so this neckline was just for her. It follows the neckline shape of the Lotus version B, but with everything raised by a couple of centimetres. If you want to do this modification it’s simple with a French curve, but just beware that the neck hemming is a little harder because there’s less room for manoeuvre. It might be worth adding a neckband if you do want to raise the neckline Mum wears this with bright coloured slim fit jeans, and it looks so summery!

HELLO LOULOU!!!

Our next pattern is the Loulou “modesty shorties” for girls (I only discovered this term recently!) I love that we live in an age where girls can play the same games as boys, but sometimes dresses aren’t too practical… enter Loulou! If, like me, you sew for a little girl who loves dresses but also loves to run, climb, and throw herself around, then this pattern will become a staple! Loulou is simple and quick to make, and although it does come with fabric requirements, really it can be made out of scraps or offcuts. I have also made some out of last year’s dresses, so that the fabric is recycled!

 

When I did a preview of Loulou on Instagram, a number of people said they wished the sizes went higher, and so we have extended the range to go up to age 14.

A few IG friends have asked for this pattern in women’s sizes so we will be doing that at some point, but in the meantime look what fun I had with the older girls pattern!

 

I used the girls age 14 size and made pyjama shorts for summer. I used ¼” seam allowances in case I couldn’t squeeze into the age 14, but in the end I could have kept them at 3/8”. Since they’re for sleeping in, it’s quite nice to have them looser though.

 

My latest sew was for my daughter’s birthday, she wanted a twirly skirt and so we made a pattern for her that we’ll work into a proper pattern in the next few months – the Loulou shorties fit underneath! So she got a beautiful AND practical birthday skirt.

We’d love to hear how you get on sewing Loulou!

My sewing story

And so I find myself writing my first ever blog post. It’s not something I ever thought I’d do, but here I am, and I hope you’ll stay with me! Rather than launch straight into my makes, I thought I’d talk a bit about how I came to be here, so you can get to know me a little. I’d love it if you’d leave me comments so I can get to know you too! Bear with me for a couple of paragraphs, and then I’ll stick some photos in 🙂

I started sewing as a child: my mum taught me to hand sew, and I did a lot of embroidery and made stuffed toys and accessories. As a teenager, my sewing adventures were along the lines of ‘cut the calf seams of my jeans to insert corduroy godets and make flares’ or ‘chop off my jeans at the hip to make mini shorts’… accessorised with carefully pre-scuffed Doc Marten boots of course. It was the 1990s, after all…

In my twenties I mostly exercised my sewing skills by sewing on the odd button and raising or lengthening hems. The sewing highlight of those years was a fancy dress outfit: I was living in Paris at the time, and my friend had a themed party where we all had to come dressed as characters from Beatles songs (to this day I think it was the best theme ever). So off I went to a little fabric shop in Montmartre, and bought 3 metres of cheap black fabric with silver stars all over it. Equipped with one small needle and a reel of thread, I made a floor-length strapless gown with a corseted back and a train, added some cheap sparkly jewellery, and ta-da: Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds. I caught the metro there with Lady Madonna and Penny Lane, obviously…

Through my twenties and early thirties I bought a lot of ‘disposable’ fashion, buying for the sake of buying, and not really thinking much about process or waste. Then when I was pregnant with my first child and found out we were expecting a baby girl, suddenly I wanted to sew for her the way my mum had done for me. So we grabbed a bunch of old pillowcases, sat in front of my mum’s machine, and she kept me at it until I could sew. I couldn’t be more grateful.

So there I was, sewing baby clothes (on a new machine – a birthday gift from my parents), and loving seeing my daughter in things I had made for her (mostly by Simplicity and Butterick, if you’re interested!)

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And then I thought, why not sew for myself?

Enter the Sorbetto top from Colette Patterns. Around this time I was doing LOOOONG breastfeeds for my daughter, and I had plenty of time to read ‘sewing theory’ and sewing blogs with one hand while nursing her with the other. So I got my head round darts, bias binding, and all the rest of it, and took the plunge. 6 Sorbetto tops later, I was ready to call myself a sewist. I started with fairly simple designs: Colette’s Laurel and Sencha, a few Simplicity tops and skirts, and some projects from the Great British Sewing Bee books (this was when GBSB was starting out, perfect timing for me!)

And then I was pregnant again. So my handmade clothes didn’t fit my burgeoning belly and boobs any more, and I went back to sewing for my daughter, as well as whipping up a few maternity dresses and tops.

(I don’t know why pregnancy made me go all-out for pink…)

When our baby boy was born, my first projects for him were self-drafted trousers when he was at that awkward stage of being too big for his 0-3 month clothes but swamped by his 3-6 month ones. Then I discovered Oliver and S, and made his baptism outfit from their Lullaby Layette pattern (mine was a sleeveless Deer and Doe Aubépine :)).

Around this time, I discovered jersey… and I’ve never looked back. 90% of my makes are now in knit fabrics, with my favourites being the Marianne by Christine Haynes, Mesa and Winona by Seamwork, the Camas blouse from Thread Theory, and the wonderful Skater dress from Tanya Whelan’s superb book Sew many dresses sew little time.

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As for my favourite makes for children, there are plenty to show you soon, but for now I’ll give a shout-out to the Snapdragon dress from Sew like my mom and the Kensington t-shirt from Hey June Handmade…

OK, so there are a few exceptions to my “jersey rules” mantra: the top one is JEANS. I am so grateful to Heather of Closet Case Patterns for her Ginger and Morgan designs. And I also like jackets, especially the (for me much-missed) Pavot by Deer and Doe and the Secret Agent Trench by Oliver and S. I’ll blog about all of those another day.

(Less-than-perfect pics of my oh-so-beautiful Ginger jeans… I took them before I decided to start a blog! Better ones to come soon, I promise!)

It’s my love of jersey that kick-started my search for the perfect t-shirt. I tried so many, but there wasn’t one that made me stop my search. So I studied pattern drafting while my husband, a professional computer whizz, studied CAD (computer assisted design). We brought the two together, and Valentine and Stitch patterns was born. Watch this space for more on that, but for now here’s a little peek at one of my designs for children…

And so here I am, the newest sewing blogger on the block. At first I just started reading blogs to get a sense of how particular patterns would fit, and whether they would suit me. I didn’t think blogging was something I’d do myself (so many excuses: how will I set it up? When will I find the time? Who will want to read it anyway?) But I started to feel like I knew these people, and so here I am, hoping to connect with you, and to give something back to the sewing community that has given me so much.

Thank you for reading my first blog post, and I hope you’ll keep coming back!