Tag Archives: sewing tutorials

A4 tiled or A0 copyshop? Working with PDF patterns, and a review of Netprinter

OK, first of all, in manner of a modern-day Miss Marple I have solved the mystery of the missing upper collar piece from my Deneuve coat. This weekend I discovered it nestling between two books on a sewing room shelf lower down than where I keep my in-progress makes. And when I say “lower down”, that is a super-sleuth knowing euphemism for “toddler height”…

The mystery of the lost collar piece is solved. And gives me an excuse to show you one last photo of THAT COAT (and my flower umbrella, which henceforth I want on all my photoshoots).

Right, onto the order of the day: PDF patterns! As many of you will know, we create our patterns in two formats: the A4 tiled format that you assemble yourself, and single-page files (typically A0) that can be printed in large format at a copy shop. So today I’m going to talk about the benefits of each, and about my experience of ordering A0 printouts from Netprinter, a printing company based in Plymouth, UK.

When we started up as a PDF pattern company, there were a few “must-haves” that I discussed with Rich. Firstly, as little paper wastage as possible. Secondly, a user-friendly design. Thirdly, the option of A0/ copyshop format, for those customers who might prefer traditional “paper” patterns. Rich exceeded what I had asked for: he puts his long-abandoned Tetris skills to good use playing around with the pattern pieces to make sure they fit together as neatly as possible on the page, and uses a distinct colour and outline for each size. Then he adds in the little triangles on each inner edge to help line up the pattern pages, and puts a pale grey number in the centre of each sheet. A sample sticking layout looks like this:

Dune tank top tiled PDF layout

And here are my top recommendations for sticking together A4 tiled PDFs:

  1. Stick your pattern pages together on a table, so that you’re not crouching over on the floor.
  2. Use a guillotine/ paper cutter to trim edges. You can purchase them from most office supplies or stationery stores, and they are way quicker than scissors. I use a small one from good old WHSmith, and I typically cut 4 pages at a time.
  3. Cut only 2 edges of each piece. I always cut the right hand long side and the bottom short side. This makes the pages all the same size, and easy to line up.
  4. Use a tape dispenser! You wouldn’t believe how long I used to spend cutting small pieces of tape with my special tape scissors (not that the scissors themselves are anything special, I just mean they were blunted from cutting tape so they became designated tape scissors!) My tape dispenser has revolutionised my PDF-sticking. I know some people use glue sticks: I’ve never tried this (I can’t help but think of all the craftwork my daughter brings home from school and how the glued-on bits invariably come unstuck!), but feel free to argue the case in the comments below!!

But what about the people who don’t like sticking together a tiled PDF? Well, this is where the online copyshops come in! My impression from some Instagram comments is that in other countries there are more bricks-and-mortar copyshops than we are used to here in the UK – my sole local copyshop charges something exorbitant for an A0 sheet.  Enter Netprinter, who are becoming more and more known in the sewing community. Before recommending them I wanted to try out their service, and the things I was particularly interested in were the following:

  1. Cost per A0 sheet
  2. Cost of P&P
  3. Whether files larger than A0 could be printed (since we have 2 maxi length patterns whose pattern pieces are larger than a standard A0 sheet)
  4. Quality of service.

I had a chat with the manager, Simon, over on Instagram, and he gave me an email address to write and discuss my order (the email contact details are also available on their website). I sent over all the details: most of our files are standard A0, though the Dune maxi dress is A0 portrait width but longer, and the Edie cardigan is A0 landscape but longer. I’ll come back to these two in a moment.

Simple upload page to place your order

I was offered a choice of standard 80gsm paper at 75p per A0 sheet, or the 60gsm weight that Netprinter have sourced especially for the sewing community, at £1.50 per sheet. I thought it would be good to have a comparison, so I ordered each file in both weights of paper.

The 60gsm paper is the one automatically offered under the new “Sewing pattern printing” section of the website; the 80gsm paper is available via the “Plan printing” section. I can see why the 60gsm paper has been sourced for sewists, as it is more lightweight and so it is easier to pin to fabric if you’re cutting straight into your pattern sheet rather than tracing off your size. However, my personal preference was for the 80gsm paper, as I like to have the full sheet to keep intact, and I find the standard letter paper weight to be more durable in this respect. But  I think it’s great to have the option, so big thumbs up there.

I didn’t try the colour printing service as I’m happy with black and white. However, you can have your A0 file printed in colour on 60gsm weight paper for £4 per sheet. The quality of the black and white printing was great (don’t be fooled by my pics – the lines don’t show up very well in all of them, but that was down to the lighting and taking photos of large sheets of paper from afar!), and I was really impressed by how accurately and meticulously all my printouts had been folded – they will be simple to store, and to re-fold after use.

My completed order, neatly folded and packed in an A4-sized box#

My order was dealt with on the day I placed it (even though I placed the order in the afternoon) and I received it the following day via DPD (signed-for delivery with a one-hour timeslot). Netprinter’s delivery charges are £3.00 for up to 14 patterns (if you want guaranteed next day delivery there is a higher charge of £8.50 for up to 15 patterns, and the charges for shipping to Europe are set at £15, though this is for up to 100 patterns so if you had a mega order or were putting in an order with a group of sewing friends, it would work out very reasonably).

If you are having files larger than A0 printed, be sure to check that they are A0 PORTRAIT width, whatever the length. This is the case for the Dune maxi file, and it means it can just be printed on a longer roll of paper. I was charged £2.50 on 60gsm paper and £1.60 on 80gsm paper for these printouts. For Edie, the single file is A0 landscape, which is not a size of printout that’s offered by Netprinter, so we used our alternative Edie copy shop files (where the pattern is split into two A0 sheets). This was very simple and just means that you stick two A0 sheets together to create your master sheet.

I may not have gone for colour printing, but I compensate with explosions of colour on the finished garment!

So would I recommend Netprinter? Yes, definitely. They offer a professional service, and they clearly work hard to ensure that they deal with orders quickly. In particular, if you are just dealing with standard sized files that you can upload to the system, it’s about as speedy as you can get. And so in this age of instant gratification, Netprinter makes a valuable contribution to the sewing community by delivering printouts of PDF patterns to your door the very next day – possibly before you’d have had time to cut and stick together your A4 tiled PDF. Given the flat-rate postage fee, though, it’s worth waiting until you have several patterns to print off in one go – that would certainly be how to make the most of your order. I highly recommend Netprinter to all our A0-loving customers and sewing friends in the UK, and recommend that those further afield seek out a similar service, as if you want one single large pattern sheet then the A0 option is definitely worth considering!

What about you, sewing friends? Any thoughts on PDF vs paper patterns, or on A4 tiled vs A0 pattern sheets? Or perhaps you have sticking tips for A4 tiled patterns that you’d like to share?

Till next time, happy sewing/ sticking/ cutting!

New pattern: Edie, the cardigan for all seasons

We’re very excited to be launching our new pattern, Edie! Read on for everything you need to know about Edie, as well as a special launch week discount code!

We had always planned to design a cardigan for release after summer, and Edie is making us feel just a little bit less sad about the cooler weather! There are two lengths to choose from, and depending on your fabric choice Edie can be smart, casual, cosy, or downright shop-stopping! Edie is a longline open-front cardigan, fitted through the back and floaty at the front. The unique shaping of the front pieces give Edie a beautiful drape, but also make the front wide enough to wrap around you if you want to cosy up in your new cardigan.

Time for the photo gallery! So far I’ve made four versions of Edie, shall we start with the standard length?

In the last days of summer I made this from a lightweight lace-effect polyester jersey from Minerva Crafts. I had spent half the summer wishing I had a cardigan with me, one that would go with everything and could be rolled up in a bag and pulled out as needed. Of course I finished this Edie on the hottest day of summer, but I still threw it on to take some photos anyway!

My other standard-length Edie is in this gorgeous “cotton cashmere” sweater knit from Emma OneSock. Who doesn’t need a black cardigan in the cooler seasons?! I think this is the one I’ll wear the most, as it goes with pretty much everything. I’ve worn it with the sleeveless Angelina dress pictured above, with jeans, with a Margarita skirt, belted over a dress (pictured below), and on our wedding anniversary earlier this month I wore it with my one of my maxi Dunes (also pictured below, battling against the wind in our local park!):

 

Speaking of maxi length, let’s look at the second version of Edie! I’ve truly jumped on the maxi trend this year, and after the Dune dress we wanted a maxi cardigan too. About 15 years ago I had a knee-length cardigan that I wore to death because it made any outfit look instantly elegant, and that’s exactly our hope for maxi Edie. My first one is in this gorgeous blue marl sweater knit, again from Emma OneSock, and I am in love:

After making this one, I wondered whether Edie could function as a ‘coatigan’ until the really cold weather kicks in, so I pulled this quilted sweatshirting out of my stash and went for it. I was a little bit afraid that the quilting might make it look more like a dressing gown than a cardigan, but I was pleased with the result:

This one looks particularly good belted, and is so cosy in this sweatshirt fabric. In the instruction booklet we do recommend that if you’re using a thicker fabric like this, you might like to widen the sleeves so that you can still wear something long-sleeved underneath without the sleeves feeling tight: we’ve prepared a tutorial on this here. For reference, the sleeves are NOT widened in these pics, and I find them fine over a long-sleeved t-shirt, but over anything thicker I’d want them to have a little more ease. And note the awkward arm placement in the right-hand photo. to try and show you what the sleeve looks like in a thicker fabric!).

The instruction booklet has a guide regarding the maxi length, so that you can make sure you get it right for you (and if you want a reminder of our sizing guide, you can find it here). You can follow the suggestions in the instruction booklet, or make a quick sleeveless toile out of old or unloved fabric, like I did:

Pink camo for the win again!

One more tutorial for Edie: we recommend that if you don’t want the back neckline to stretch, you stabilise it. This is not essential, and I haven’t done it for all of mine. In particular, though, if you do a rolled hem as I have, the neckline will stretch a little with wear – it gives a casual look which I quite like in a cardigan, but if that’s not the look you want then do follow the tutorial. Here are a couple of pics to show you what the rolled hem neckline looks like unstabilised after a few wears, and then you can make your own decision about whether or not you want to include this step!

I like the way that the “lettuce” effect mirrors the finishes in the rest of the cardigan, but if you prefer a more structured neckline at the back then do follow the tutorial to stabilise it! Next, here are some back views of the different versions:

 

And finally, if you follow us on Instagram you might have spotted some “twirling” shots, as what would a photo shoot be with no twirling?! So here is a little compilation of me and my Edies spinning around:

So Edie is taking me from casual coverup to layering staple to style statement to cool weather elegance. What do you think? Which Edie is your favourite?

To get your copy of Edie, visit the pattern page here, and use the code EDIE25 at checkout for 25% off during launch week! Code valid until midnight BST on Tuesday 26 September 2017.

Simplicity turns 90: floral fever for Valentine & Stitch

When I saw that Simplicity were holding a sewing contest to celebrate their 90th birthday, I couldn’t resist. I grew up wearing Simplicity clothes my mum made for me, and they were the first patterns I used when I returned to sewing after my daughter was born. So I rolled up my sleeves, stepped out of my comfort zone, and chose the “vintage” category (why do the words “step out of my comfort zone” always send a chill through my bones?!) I also signed up to sew the men’s shirt as I have been meaning to make Rich a new shirt for a while – I had a lovely cotton voile that he had thought I’d bought for him (because it was similar to the fabric of his favourite summer shirt) and he seemed quite downcast when I said I’d bought it for me, so I’d secretly been plotting to use it for him! (And this was 2 and a half years ago, so you can see how speedy I am at getting on with such things…)

Challenge #1: Vintage make

First off, let me say that the design and detail of this pattern (Simplicity 8342) is really interesting and well thought through. In particular I love the cap sleeves of the version I chose. Let me also say that it is NOT my style at all, and I knew that before starting. So any “negatives” I might express aren’t about the pattern itself, but about how I feel wearing the top.

The finished top. I know I’m smiling, but inside I’m wondering if I have muffin top!!

The construction of this top is quite complex. I can see why it was chosen for a challenge, as for a small summer top it takes a lot of time and attention. I followed the instructions to the letter except for a couple of additions:

At the centre front, rather than sewing from each side to the centre and then handstitching the centre, I sewed as one seam, carefully feeding it through my overlocker so that I didn’t pull it out of shape. This worked well, and gives a nice neat finish at centre front. You can also see in the montage below some of the nice finishings you get on the right side of the top (definitely worth a bit of complex construction!):

At the centre back, after I had basted the back straps and checked the fit I coverstitched them in place, stitching exactly over the lines of stitching I used to secure my elastic channel in place. This made a neater finish:

It does mean that the straps are not attached until about 1” below the top of the centre back, but the top is so fitted that they can’t possibly gape! I would have preferred the inside finish of the straps at the back to be neater (top right pic), but I’m not sure how you would manage this (I did scratch my head over it, and came up with a big fat nothing!)

Here are my general thoughts on this pattern:

The cap sleeves really are very pretty and flattering, and the way the straps and ties are lined makes these features very neat:

The adjustable straps also allow you to make sure you can fit it perfectly to your torso.

The numerous pattern pieces are quite small, so I made the whole top from offcuts of the Dune maxi dress I blogged about here.

If I were to sew this again, the one thing I’d do differently would be to secure the back elastic right at the inner edge of the seam allowance, rather than including it in the seam allowance (as the seam here is very bulky).

To finish this section, here’s a little gallery of the finished top:

I can see objectively that this is a very pretty top, and you already know from my earlier post how much I love this fabric! The style is something I need to get used to though, as I’m more used to trying to hide my curves than to celebrating them! Nonetheless, it’s a nice summery piece to wear with jeans. Plus I had a glorious day to photograph it on – that rainbow line isn’t a filter, it’s just the light bouncing off the camera lens!

Challenge #2: Menswear

Next up is Rich’s shirt. This is Simplicity 8180. It’s advertised as a “3-hour shirt”, and it is pretty simple in terms of construction. I think this was my big problem with it – because some of the detail was quite simplified, it wasn’t what I was expecting and so I found it quite counter-intuitive at times. I have to say though that it would be great as a first introduction to sewing a men’s shirt. After reading the pattern instructions I did note down some things I would do differently, and here is a retrospective look at them:

The first thing I did differently was to use felled seams. I find them so much neater and more professional looking than the recommended “press open and finish as desired” method. Top left is the seam from the outside, top right from the inside. This also gives a lovely neat cross at seam joins, as you can see in the bottom right photo (the bottom left shows some topstitching detail I also added):

I also used a trick for the interfacing that is by no means new or original to me, but I’ll note it here:

 

  1. On the edge that will be visible on the inside of the garment, sew the right side of the fabric to the non-fusible side of the facing with a 1/8” seam (top right pic).
  2. Turn out so that the wrong side of the fabric faces the fusible side of the facing.
  3. Very carefully, press this seam on the right side of the fabric.
  4. Fuse the rest of the interfacing to the fabric.

Then you end up with a neat enclosed seam (left pic, and closeup on bottom right), rather than having to finish the seam allowances with an overlocker or a zigzag stitch.

I mentioned before in my post about sewing jeans that I don’t trim the seams for the waistband corners, but use them to strengthen the corner. I decided to do the same for the collar, even though it’s not a 90 degree angle (I got out my protractor and can confirm it’s 75 degrees!) and was pleased that it worked. Here is my process:

  1. Fold corner down inwards (top left pic).
  2. Fold each seam on top of the corner to make a diagonal join (top right and bottom left pics).
  3. Hold in place with one hand, then with the other reach through on the right side of the fabric, and pull gently to the right side.
  4. Use a point turner to neaten.

As you can see from the bottom right pic, it worked really well. I also topstitched the collar, which the instructions don’t call for, but I like it for a cleaner and more professional finish. I used the method I mentioned in my last Morgan jeans post for the corner topstitching, and that gave a lovely crisp corner:

  1. Knot one end of a piece of thread, and pass through the corner (top left pic).
  2. As you are sewing, when you approach the corner, pull gently on the loose end of the thread to lift the fabric away from the feed dogs (bottom left pic).
  3. Leave the needle down in the fabric at the corner as you turn the fabric round (top right pic).
  4. Keep pulling gently on the thread as you sew down the other side.

Another success! Beautiful topstitched corners. Though please forgive the shadows on these past two picture montages: I did the sewing in the evenings and so the photos are taken in artificial light!

I also topstitched all the way along the centre front and centre back, to keep my edges neat and crisp. You can see that in the photo higher up the page.

I did everything else according to the instructions, until…

When everything was sewn in place, I got Rich to try it on. It was ENORMOUS. I had chosen a size M based on his measurements, which was no surprise as he is a size M in every sewing pattern I’ve made for him (as well as in RTW). But when he put it on he looked like one of those adverts for weight loss where the person puts on the shirt that used to be tight to show how slim they now are. Seriously, I wanted to weep. It was too late to start playing around with darts without unpicking the whole thing, and I was only a week away from the deadline at this point! So I brought out the original and beloved shirt, and laid it on top of mine. You can see here how much bigger mine was:

So I pinned carefully around the outline of the RTW shirt, then got out my French curve and some tailor’s chalk and measured a new outline that was mirrored on both sides. I then added seam allowances, and cut along my new line. I also cut 2 inches off the length and the sleeve length by using my overlocker, as a quick way of ensuring I kept the original shaping of the shirt. The pic at top right shows you just how much fabric came off each side seam, and the bottom shows a mistake of mine: I hadn’t realised that there was a chunk cut out of my shirt bottom at centre back! So talk about a blessing in disguise, since that’s exactly the amount I needed to chop off to make the shirt the right length!! You can see from the offcut piece that I also shaped the shirt mimicking the much-loved RTW one. So finally I get to take my turn behind the camera! This is the finished result:

Overall the resulting silhouette is much better, but the real shame is that the shoulder seam sits too low down on the arm because it came up so large. It’s not unwearable, but it’s not perfect and that bothers me, especially when you look at this back view:

So would I make this shirt again? Probably not, though I would certainly recommend it to beginners. I loved taking part in the challenge, but overall I prefer a men’s shirt with a collar stand and button placket, and also with a back yoke and darts or pleats. I would also sooner go with a tried and true pattern that I know fits Rich, than mess around trying to adapt the pattern pieces for a better fit. But there is also a pattern for a tie included in this packet, and that I may just try! And all things considered, this is still a nice shirt that Rich can wear in the summer, and I know that in terms of finish it looks good. More importantly, Rich likes it – so if he’s happy, then so am I!

So to finish, here are some “floral fever” shots of our duo of Simplicity challenge makes:

I’m wearing my top here with a Colette Mabel pencil skirt. I thought I’d try to go for the full-on curvalicious silhouette, but I’ll give you three guesses as to how comfortable I felt in it!!

And finally, HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SIMPLICITY! Thank you for this fun competition!

Sewing McCalls 7542 in a knit fabric for Sleevefest

A while before Diane and I started thinking about the Sleevefest sewing challenge, I had noticed this McCall’s pattern cropping up on Instagram – M7542 is a fitted top with five statement sleeve options. About half-way through Sleevefest, Sew Now magazine included it as a free pattern in their August issue, and so I got the pattern to make up in honour of Sleevefest!

The pattern is for woven fabrics: it has bust darts at the front and neck darts at the back, and these give the top a semi-fitted shape. The back is finished with a small placket and a hook and eye closure at the neckline. Four of the five sleeve options come from a short fitted sleeve that is embellished with a pleated, gathered, bubble or trumpet cuff. The first three come to the elbow, the trumpet cuff is asymmetrical and drapes to the wrist on the inner arm. Then the fifth option is a tulip-style crossover sleeve that also ends at the elbow.

I love love love the dramatic trumpet sleeve (view B), and that’s the one I thought I’d make, BUT I did want a top I could wear in my everyday life, and so I decided to start with my second favourite, the tulip sleeve (view A).

Look at that sleeve-y goodness!

You know what’s coming next. This pattern is for wovens, and I love sewing with knits. Although I had mentally earmarked a gorgeous eyelet fabric I have in my stash, I was looking at the pattern and I thought that actually the shape of the bodice wasn’t going to do me any favours. This top really is all about the sleeve, but if I was going to get wear out of it, I had to feel good in it. Sooooo… I decided to adapt the pattern for use with a knit fabric.

This will work for pretty much any woven top, so here’s what I did:

First, I decided on my size. The size charts put me as a UK 10 for the bust and a 10-12 for the waist and hips. Although making the pattern in a knit would usually mean that I’d go down a size, in my head I had already envisaged this being loose and floaty, so I kept to those sizes and graded from a size 10 to a 12 at the waist. I have already learned that McCalls patterns tend to come up big on me – remember my M7574 dress? – but I thought I’d just go for it as I was aiming for an oversized look. I’d already ordered this dreamy slub viscose jersey from Minerva Crafts, and it was begging to be made into a floaty top. Also, when it arrived I found that it’s a little see-through, so I couldn’t risk the top being too tight as I didn’t want my bra to show through!

Gratuitous sleeve poses

So, onto the modifications. The first thing to do is to remove the darts – you just don’t need them in a knit unless you have a much more impressive chest than I do. This is a simple alteration to make, illustrated below: you find the point of the bust dart in your size, and then draw a straight vertical line from here to the hem. Then cut this line from the hem upwards. Then cut along ONE of the lines of the bust dart, towards the point of the dart. You’ll end up with a piece cut out of your pattern: tilt this upwards until the line of the bust dart you have cut meets exactly with the uncut line. Tape this in place. You have now created a lovely slash and spread which will give you a nice floaty garment! Tape some pattern tracing paper to the back of your pattern to fill in the gap, and use a French curve to join up the hem in the space you have created.

Remove the back darts in the same way. For this top, it makes the back slightly more flared than the front, but I liked the idea of a swingy back so I didn’t do any further modifications to the shape in that respect. However, since the pattern piece for the back has a shaped centre seam to enhance the fit, I needed to take that out for my floaty top and create a back bodice piece that could be cut on the fold. This is super-simple: I just measured in the 5/8” seam allowance at the neckline, and drew a straight line down to the hem, parallel to the grainline arrow. I then cut along this line and marked the new pattern piece to be cut on the fold.

There are no modifications to be made to the sleeve pieces, only to the way you sew up the sleeves. Basically, the top can now be sewn like any other t-shirt, with a bit of special attention to the tulip sleeves. I used an overlocker for all my seams, but keep in mind that you need to use a 5/8” seam rather than the 3/8” you would normally use for knits, as the pattern is designed for wovens. I also decided to do rolled hems for my finishings, to enhance the floaty look.

Floatiness in action with some “walking towards camera” shots

So, here’s how I did it:

  1. Attach the front to the back at the shoulders, and press the seam to the back.
  2. Finish the neckline (I used a rolled hem, but you could press under and hem with a twin needle or coverstitch machine, or draft a neckband).
  3. Hem the sleeve front and back pieces. I used a narrow rolled hem on my overlocker, giving a lettuce effect to the hems.
  4. Baste the back sleeve pieces onto the front sleeve pieces as indicated in the instructions (step 14), aligning the large circle marking on each piece. DO NOT sew the sleeve seams as directed in the instructions (step 12): this instruction is for set-in sleeves, and with this knit fabric modification we can sew the sleeve seam at the same time as the side seam.

    Omit step 12; you’ve already done step 13; do step 14!

  5. Pin the sleeves to the armscyes, right sides together. Align the large circle with the shoulder seam and the underarm edges of the bodice and sleeve. Ease the sleeve into the armscye, pinning every inch or so.
  6. Sew the sleeve to the bodice, and press the seam towards the sleeve.
  7. Pin the side seams, right sides together: pin at the underarm seam, the bodice hem and the sleeve hem, and then line up the seams, pinning every inch or so.
  8. At this point, I recommend basting the sleeve hem. Since you’ve done a rolled hem, you won’t be turning up the sleeve hem again, and so you want the edges of your sleeve to align nicely at the seam. Using a regular sewing machine and a long straight stitch, baste together from the hem edge downwards – just an inch or two will suffice.
  9. Sew the side seams from the bottom of the bodice hem all the way up to the sleeve hem. Remove your basting stitches.

Ta-daaa!! Beautifully aligned seams, thanks to the basting.

At this point I tried on my top, and I wasn’t too keen on the neckline. It’s quite a high neckline, and because I’d done the rolled hem, it stood a bit proud from my shoulders, a bit like a mini ruff!

Awkward tilted head pose, trying to show how the neckline looks!

I played around with a few ideas and ALMOST went with boat neck, but I thought a soft v neck would look perfect with the lines of those tulip sleeves, and with the rolled hem would create an almost scalloped effect. So I went back to my pattern pieces and traced the neckline I wanted onto them, then carefully folded my top in half, creating centre fold lines at the front and back, and pinned the pattern pieces back onto the bodice before cutting along my new necklines and doing a new rolled hem.

New neckline, same awkward head tilt. Ignore my frown lines – I promise I do love this top!

I recommend doing this stage MUCH earlier – i.e. when you’re prepping your pattern pieces! Anyway, only one more stage to go:

  1. Hem the bottom of the garment – I used a rolled hem again, to be in keeping with the rest of my top.

That’s it! A whole new way to sew this already versatile pattern. Plus, once you’ve done all the modifications to your pattern pieces, this is a super-quick sew! How long do you think it’ll be before I do it with that AMAZING trumpet sleeve?! This is a fabulous top to wear with jeans (in these photos I’m wearing one of my pairs of Ginger jeans), and it feels so comfortable but yet is a bit more special than a regular t-shirt. When I put it on for this photo shoot, I couldn’t help remembering a time when I lived in Paris and would treat myself to coffee and cake at a smart salon de thé, and the ladies there always looked so expensive. I remember thinking I could never look like that, whatever clothes or makeup I wore… and when I put this outfit on, I felt like those ladies! The irony is that the denim for my jeans was a remnant at around £7, and the fabric for my top cost £3.99! Who knew “expensive” could be so cheap 😉

Have I mentioned how much I love this look?

For more gorgeous sleeves, including some wonderful variations on this pattern, check out the #sleevefest2017 hashtag on Instagram! And to find out more about how Sew Now magazine styled this pattern for their August issue, click here.

OK OK, last photo I promise!

Till next time, happy sewing!

Dune meets Sleevefest! Free bonus sleeve hack pattern piece

To celebrate both #sleevefest2017 and the release of Dune, we have created a basic sleeve piece for Dune, that you can hack and adapt however you choose!

First read Rich’s note on the basic sleeve:

It’s important to mention that this sleeve is not meant to be added to Dune without any alterations! It is a basic straight sleeve designed to fit into the armscye of Dune, but then you can get creative with the rest of it! It is a block – a basic version of a garment (or here, a part of a garment), which you then alter. It’s important to remember that a block is not a sloper – this is a very close-fitting version of a garment, to which then you need to add ease (space so that you can move freely) and make any alterations you want to make.

Important points to think about in designing your sleeve are length, fit (along the arm and at the wrist) and shape. It’s also important to make the sleeve fit the armscye correctly, but we’ve taken care of that for you J. We’d also like to point out a few more things about the pattern piece so you can get the most out of it. Notice that the sleeve is quite loose at the wrist, and so think about the fit you want there. Also, it is a straight line from the bottom of the armscye to the wrist, meaning that it will be quite loose fitting along the length of the arm too, so you could think about bringing that line in. It is completely fine to do this as a curve – if you are doing this, bear in mind that you will probably want a tighter curve at the armscye, to bring the line in to your arm quite quickly.

So, get to know your sleeve, and then let your imagination run free! 

To give you some ideas, we are offering a series of tutorials using the Dune top and the new sleeve piece, and we start off with floaty flared sleeves! Just go to the ‘Patterns’ tab in the menu bar, then click on ‘Tutorials’, and then on ‘sleeve hack tutorials’. All of the tutorials will work for almost any sleeve, but I’ll be working with Dune to show you how to do the hacks. Hope they’ll kick-start some new ideas for Sleevefest!

You can also check out my blog posts on Sleevefest and on Dune for more inspiration!

Have fun with your sleeves!